Superheroes: The Best of Philosophy and Pop Culture, William Irwin (ed.)

Logos for Marvel Comics and DC Comics, two of ...

Building on a growing trend of “Philosophy and…” books that run the gamut of pop cultures, Superheroes is a great way to introduce people to philosophy, especially those who might not be otherwise inclined. A series of essays, the work covers both the Marvel and DC universes as well as philosophers from Plato through to Derek Parfit (b. 1942). It would be easy to dismiss this series as nothing more than philosophical fluff dumbed-down for the masses, but I think one would be missing something to do so. As William Irwin states in the Introduction, “Ultimately, this book aims to shed light on the hidden depth of superheroes, while at the same time illustrate the importance of philosophy. Superman and Batman are not replacements for Plato and Aristotle, but they can inspire you to read Plato and Aristotle, who will challenge you to think deeply.” And after all, isn’t that what we ask of any good book?

Through the Killing Glass: Alice in Deadland Book II by Mainak Dhar

English: Image shows three young Chinese Red G...

Pretty decent follow-up to Alice in Deadland . The former residents of the Deadland have formed a community (Wonderland) and humans and Biters are building a fragile peace. Of course, the Red Guards are not so quick to forget the ragtag bunch that bloodied their noses. Alice must hold together this coalition in the face of new enemies, both internal and external, while at the same time receiving help from unexpected quarters. Definitely a zombie tale with a twist.